Genderfucked
I don’t care about my gender identity as much anymore.

Presentation is another matter, however. Gender roles as well.

uncaged-mind:

There’s just something about this photo that makes me think, “Oh yeah! I can’t be…gay.”
And it’s this woman’s bountiful ass.

….OR this makes you wonder just how gay you ARE.

uncaged-mind:

There’s just something about this photo that makes me think, “Oh yeah! I can’t be…gay.”

And it’s this woman’s bountiful ass.

….OR this makes you wonder just how gay you ARE.

sexgenderbody:

genderqueer:

Submitted by stephenpacuk:
my name is stephen, i’m 20 and in brooklyn. i’ve just recently begun to identify and embrace my genderqueer identity. this is a self-portrait, and it feels like the first picture i’ve ever taken of myself.

human being

sexgenderbody:

genderqueer:

Submitted by stephenpacuk:

my name is stephen, i’m 20 and in brooklyn. i’ve just recently begun to identify and embrace my genderqueer identity. this is a self-portrait, and it feels like the first picture i’ve ever taken of myself.

human being

uncaged-mind:

Confession #020
I’m terrified of people “finding out.” I need to stop being afraid of what they’ll do/say/think and start living my life without out this constant fear of judgment.
It’s time to actually break down the walls of shame and start building up the misplaced joy. The joy of self acceptance.

uncaged-mind:

Confession #020

I’m terrified of people “finding out.” I need to stop being afraid of what they’ll do/say/think and start living my life without out this constant fear of judgment.

It’s time to actually break down the walls of shame and start building up the misplaced joy. The joy of self acceptance.

miikkaaxx:

a handy guide on how to figure out your sexuality, by karen.

miikkaaxx:

a handy guide on how to figure out your sexuality, by karen.

doakaloid:

  • the point of demisexuality isn’t to claim one is some sort of “special snowflake.”
  • there are a lot of sexual people who only want to have sex inside of a relationship.
  • the primary difference between a sexual who only wants to have sex inside of a relationship and a demisexual…
gqid:

The June 2011 genderqueer flag is version 3.0 and final of such designs by me (Marilyn Roxie | neonsigh on Tumblr; see also 2.0 and 1.0). The flag is a series of horizontal bars, each with special meaning represented in color, and intended to unite groups and spread awareness. The meaning of the colors in the genderqueer flag design are as follows, some corresponding with other queer symbolism:
* Lavender: The mixing of blue and pink (traditional colors of men and women, also present on the trans* flag); meant to represent those under the GQ umbrella who are androgynes, bigendered, or present as androgynous. Also represents “queerness”; for example, lavender has traditionally been associated with homosexuality and bisexuality.
* Black: Meant to represent agendered status (no gender). A change from the white to be congruent with the asexual pride flag, in which black stands for asexuality. Those who identify as neither man nor woman, such as neutrois, may either see their identification as agendered, or as a “third gender” (having a non-binary identified gender), so that is why there is some differentiation. Also the placement has been changed to the middle so as to avoid disappearing colors on website backgrounds or having to add a border around the flag.
* Dark chartreuse green: The inverse of the lavender color; meant to represent non-binary (neither man nor woman) gender.
“Final” doesn’t mean the only and/or best genderqueer flag that could ever exist - I mean it’s the final such design that I will do. In a diverse community such as this, I expect to see a variety of symbols and representations although, as this is why I endeavored to design a flag in the first place, I do see the value in a more unified symbol to help increase visibility of genderqueer people and issues.
Feedback is appreciated! Various size versions will appear soon.
Cheers,
~Marilyn

gqid:

The June 2011 genderqueer flag is version 3.0 and final of such designs by me (Marilyn Roxie | neonsigh on Tumblr; see also 2.0 and 1.0). The flag is a series of horizontal bars, each with special meaning represented in color, and intended to unite groups and spread awareness. The meaning of the colors in the genderqueer flag design are as follows, some corresponding with other queer symbolism:

* Lavender: The mixing of blue and pink (traditional colors of men and women, also present on the trans* flag); meant to represent those under the GQ umbrella who are androgynes, bigendered, or present as androgynous. Also represents “queerness”; for example, lavender has traditionally been associated with homosexuality and bisexuality.

* Black: Meant to represent agendered status (no gender). A change from the white to be congruent with the asexual pride flag, in which black stands for asexuality. Those who identify as neither man nor woman, such as neutrois, may either see their identification as agendered, or as a “third gender” (having a non-binary identified gender), so that is why there is some differentiation. Also the placement has been changed to the middle so as to avoid disappearing colors on website backgrounds or having to add a border around the flag.

* Dark chartreuse green: The inverse of the lavender color; meant to represent non-binary (neither man nor woman) gender.

“Final” doesn’t mean the only and/or best genderqueer flag that could ever exist - I mean it’s the final such design that I will do. In a diverse community such as this, I expect to see a variety of symbols and representations although, as this is why I endeavored to design a flag in the first place, I do see the value in a more unified symbol to help increase visibility of genderqueer people and issues.

Feedback is appreciated! Various size versions will appear soon.

Cheers,

~Marilyn

You Know You’re Trans* When: #788 The amount that you think about pronouns, hormones, and gender per day is probably more than most cisgender people think about it in their lifetime.